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2017 January 1

Features abound in a spacious 26-foot package

 Here is a boat from a company in Florida that is very new to me. It’s a good-looking boat that would make a nice dual-purpose boat for a small family.Schedule
2017 January 1

With an emphasis on performance, this trailersailer should be equally nimble and simple

 The new 24 is based upon the work done with the 18- and 27-foot Seascapes. Initial stability is high with a very broad stern and a chine. The L/B is 2.94 and the D/L is 63.36. As far as I can tell the LOA is the DWL as it doesn’t look like there are any overhangs on this boat. It is 100% sailing length. Schedule
2017 January 1

There are plenty of options to customize this aluminum cruiser

 I’m not sure why but right now there is a real interest in aluminum  production or semi-production yachts built in Europe. I like aluminum construction. It is, maybe even including wood, the prettiest of all the materials during the build stage with a shiny, smooth aluminum surface to all the structure. In some cases it is pure yacht eye candy. But aluminum has practical advantages too. ScheduleSchedule
2016 November 1

A unique underbody should make for shallow-water sailing in style and comfort

Here is a very interesting design from Marc Lombard for the French company, Feeling. This is the first new boat I have seen from it in a few years. The promotional material says it could be a boat for “A circumnavigation in ultimate comfort.”
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2016 November 1

This slick sportboat offers speed and handling with Kiwi flair

Sometimes I whine about the absence of design documents in the review packages I get these days.  I want to see what the designer drew. Leave it to my buddy Kevin Dibley in New Zealand to knock me out by sending me an almost complete set of plans for his exquisite new 21-foot trailerable sportboat.     Schedule
2016 November 1

X4

A modern Danish design that offers a powerful sailplan

 
 X-Yachts is introducing a third line of boats to complement  its Xp (performance) models and Xc (cruising) models. The range will be the X series and the first one will be the X6 followed by this X4 model at 41 feet LOA. I have been a fan of the X-Yachts models for many years. Its in-house design team does a great job with both styling and performance. The new X series will combine comfort and speed with the latest build technologies and exceptionally high-quality materials.Schedule
2016 October 1

New cruiser includes a bevy of creature comforts

 This new Oceanis model from Beneteau makes a very good contrast to the J112E. The biggest difference is that J/112E might be more appealing to the skipper inclined to do some racing while the Oc
2016 October 1

This cutting-edge design will turn heads on racing circuits worldwide

The Melges 24 may not have been the first “sportboat” but it sure kicked the design of sportboats in the pants good and hard. The gloves came off. The new 40, designed by Botin Partners Naval Architecture, appears to be an extension of the same all or nothing approach to a 40-foot one-design sportboat. That’s a lot of sport. 
2016 October 1

Sport meets cruiser and the result is a performance offering from J/Boats that will appeal to a range of sailors

Here is the latest J/Boats entry into the cruising boat field. I’m going to assume the design is a collaborative in-house effort like the other J/Boats. Many thanks to J/Boats for providing me with actual design drawings.  I have said this before in the reviews but the cruising boats that J/Boats has produced have always managed to echo my own thoughts on what the perfect cruising boat would be for me. They combine comfort, efficiency and style into a total design package that I find very appealing. It would work for me.
2016 September 1

This folding trimaran should make for thrilling sailing

 I can’t remember when I did not associate the name Chris White with offshore multihulls. Chris has always had his own approach and he has been successful with it. Chris is probably best k
2016 September 1

Flexible layouts and good speed potential are the hallmarks of this cat

 To my eye, designer Pierre Delion designed the Explocat with comfort in mind. The D/L is 133 and that indicates a boat of “medium” displacement. But a warning here. The displacement listed i
2016 September 1

This sleek cruising cat is perfect for tradewind sailing

 My son took my 4-year-old granddaughter sailing in our new dinghy for the first time last weekend. I asked her, “Did you like sailing, Violet?” She said, “Yes, but I didn’t like tipping.
2016 July 1

The boat that brought families and friends together on the racecourse before anyone thought to call them sportboats

 Forty years ago Rod Johnstone built a boat in his garage. He did his own design work. It took Rod 17 months to finish the build and in May 1976 Ragtime was launched. That summer of racing saw Ragtime win 15 out of 17 races. People were paying attention to the fast, plain-looking 24-footer and asking “Can you build one for me?” 
2016 July 1

This folding sailboat reached a new class of sailors and continues to attract attention today

 I remember my first sail on a multihull. It was 1963 and the boat was a 17-foot Cougar Cat owned by some friends. At that time there were a few one-design cat classes starting up but none really caught on until Hobie started building his cats. But cruising multihulls would remain scarce for many more years. There were various designers promoting catamarans and trimarans but they were mostly aimed at selling plans to home builders. The multihull world was a bit “cultish” and most certainly far from mainstream.
2016 July 1

The first and second child of the ULDB movement and the wizard Bill Lee

 Now we come to the boat I chose as the most noteworthy racing boat of the last 50 years. This was a hard choice. I chose Bill Lee’s design Merlin. But Merlin was not designed to the IOR so Merlin was quickly followed by another Bill design, the Santa Cruz 70, essentially an IOR-friendly version of Merlin. Why are these boats so important? Four words: Ultra Light Displacement Boat or ULDB. 
2016 July 1

The performance cruiser that defined the category and sparked a career

 
 I chose the Valiant for the cruising category because it is generally considered the boat that began the move to “performance cruisers.” There were plenty of fast cruising boats before the Valiant but I think the Valiant is remembered for a couple of reasons. The term “performance cruiser” was attached to the V-40 early on and it became an easy way to identify the type. Also, the V-40 was a distinctive looking design that was very easy to recognize. People like what they know. And yes, I can’t deny it, I am the proud designer of the V-40. So with that in mind I will try to be objective.
2016 July 1
 Four decades ago, yacht designer Robert H. Perry challenged a review of one of his designs that had been published in SAILING Magazine, saying he could do a better job on design reviews. Then-editor Micca Hutchins took him up on his offer and his first design review—of an Allton Dunsford and Son-designed 26-footer called Carolina—was published in the April 1975 issue of SAILING.
2016 May 1

This one-design speedster is sporty and sleek, with lots of sail area for sizzle

The MC31 one-design, built by McConaghy Boats in Australia, looks to be a very fast boat. The design is most interesting but I really had to dig through the company’s material to find the designer’s name, Harry Dunning. 
2016 May 1

A dual-purpose design that doesn't sacrifice good looks

The Salona 35 is built in Croatia and was designed by the Slovenian design team J&J. This is a very nice looking boat in the genre of the true dual-purpose boat. You can race this boat or you can cruise this boat. It is designed to be well suited to both uses. Kind of the way Islanders, Pearsons and Ericsons were back in the 1970s. Makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it?
2016 May 1

Comfortable, shoal-water sailing is on the agenda for this family cruiser

 Here’s a handsome, raised saloon-type design from Marlow-Hunter. This general configuration has been gaining in popularity for many years. I can remember the first time my wife went below on one of my early raised-saloon boats. She looked around and said, “I don’t know why all boats aren’t like this.” Wives are so honest.

Perry on Design

  • With an emphasis on performance, this trailersailer should be equally nimble and simple

  • There are plenty of options to customize this aluminum cruiser

  • Features abound in a spacious 26-foot package

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